ROOK

ROOK came about because standard playing cards, with their kings, queens, and jacks, were frowned upon in many parts of the country. The Puritans ethic denounced them as especially unfit for children. This was because playing cards had evolved from the tarot, whose cards were considered by many religions to be works of the devil.

George Parker of Parker Brothers saw an opportunity to capitalize on this by publishing a game worthy of religious endorsement, rather than denouncement.

To accomplish this, George and Grace Parker recast the standard deck of playing cards, They replaced the Ace with a “1” and the jack, queen, and king with “11,” “12,” and “13” cards, and added a “14” card as well. The hearts, spades, clubs, and diamonds were replaced with “suits” of colors: red, yellow, green, and black. With this new fifty-six-card deck, whist and most other common card games could be faithfully played. The game now lacked only a title. Grace suggested naming it, for reasons unknown, Rook, after a type of crow.

Since 1906, ROOK has entertained millions and millions of card game lovers. Rook is a fun, trick-taking card game that is similar to Hearts and Bridge (Some have even called it Pinochle with training wheels) that is highly addictive.

It's much easier to play than Bridge, more fun than Pinochle, and more varied than Hearts. Rook is played with a deck of 56 numerical cards and the unique Rook bird card.

The game is played by dealing out the entire deck and placing the "Rook" in the center of the table. Each card in the deck is assigned a point value. Players and teams bid to see how many points they think they will accumulate by the end of the hand. Win tricks to pick up cards and rack up the points. Just be sure to bid wisely--not making your bid can give your opponent a big advantage. The game ends when a certain amount of points have been accumulated.

Number Of Players: 1 to 6


ROOK

ROOK $5.99

Rook is a fun, trick-taking card game that is similar to Hearts and Bridge (Some have even called it Pinochle with training wheels) that is highly addictive. Partner up (or not) and name the trump, but beware the wild Rook! This bird can change everything and ruin even the best laid out plans.

Contents of Rook:

57 playing cards Illustrated rules

"If you like Euchre, you'll love Rook. It takes Trick-Taking to the next level. Bid on how many tricks you think you can take. The highest bidder gets to call trump for that round. Certain cards have point values. You strategically try to take those tricks in order to score points. Play with or without the Rook card, which can trump any trump card. We have tons of fun playing this game over and over. As for the card color quality, no complaints from anyone as of yet. If you're undecided, try the Deluxe version." Reviewer: Nickie Enochs

ROOK DELUXE

ROOK DELUXE $11.99

Since 1906 Rook has entertained millions of card game lovers! It's much easier than Bridge, more fun than Pinochle, and more varied than Hearts. Rook Deluxe has the unique "Rook" card that can change the game completely. This edition of Rook has been called the "Player's Edition" for good reason. The art on the cards is designed like the originals, in four bright and easy to read colors. The cards are thick and come in a sturdy box. The included player's guide book has rules for many popular Rook variations such as Kentucky Discard and Tournament Rook.

If you are looking for the "old style" cards, these are the ones that you want.

Contents of Rook Deluxe:

Deck of 57 premium Rook cards 48-page book Pad of score sheets Card tray